Hard Boil Eggs

Hard Boil Eggs

You can think of eggs as a type of superfood food that contains the right amount of everything your body needs. Eggs are a great source of vitamins, antioxidants, essential amino acids and other nutrients; especially when you eat the whole egg. All of these nutrients are contained in the egg yolk and the egg white contains only protein. Eggs are packed with good sources of nutrients such as:

Folate
Vitamin B2
Vitamin B12
Vitamin B5
Vitamin A
Selenium

Eggs are often referred to as the perfect food. Cheap, widely available, versatile, and satisfying, which can help keep you feel fuller longer. Hard boil eggs are quick, easy to cook, and an affordable source of protein. Make a half-dozen hard boiled eggs for a convenient grab and go snack from your refrigerator.

A traditional fool proof method for cooking a perfect hard boil egg is to place six extra large eggs in one layer on the bottom of a small or medium size sauce pan. Add cold water to the pan to cover one-inch over the eggs. Using medium high heat, slowly bring to the boil. Put the lid on the pan when water is boiling and remove the sauce pan from the heat and place on a cold burning. Set timer for 15-minutes for extra large eggs or 12-minutes for large eggs. When time is over, place sauce pan in sink and run cold water until eggs are completely cool. Peel and refrigerate until ready to use.

HARD BOIL EGGS

Course Eggs and Luncheon Dishes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings 6
Author N. J. Sorensen, RDN

Ingredients

  • 6 each eggs

Instructions

  • Place the eggs in one layer on the bottom of a medium size sauce pan. Add cold water to the pan to cover 1-inch over the eggs. Using medium high heat, bring to the boil. Put the lid on the pan when water is boiling. Move to a cold burner. Set timer for 15-minutes. When time is over, place pan in sink and run cold water until eggs are cool. Refrigerate until ready to use.

The hard boiled eggs are easier to peel after they have been cooled. The cold water and cooling allow the egg to contract in the shell, making it easier to peel. Another benefit of quickly cooling is to minimize the chemical reaction involving sulfur from the egg white and iron from the egg yolk which create a greenish gray ring around the egg yolk. The reaction can also be caused by overcooking or high amount of iron in the cooking water. An ice bath is a good alternative if your tab water runs warm.

After the the eggs are cooled, gently roll the egg on the counter to crack the shell and the shell will start to fall off easily. Start peeling at the larger end, this is where the air pocket is, and remove the shell under running cold water to make the peeling easier. After peeling your hard boiled eggs, they can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week.

For more recipes visit EGG AND LUNCHEON DISHES.